March/April 2014 Campus Technical Assistance and Resource Project Newsletter

Campus Newsletter

A newsletter created by the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women’s Campus Technical Assistance and Resource Project 2nd issue, includes information on the research of security during study abroad, national awareness activities and events, technical assistance (TA) updates, and technical assistance contacts.

Campus Technical Assistance Newsletter

Screen shot 2014-08-11 at 11.10.03 AM

A newsletter created by the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women’s Campus Technical Assistance and Resource Project  2nd issue, includes information on the research of security during study abroad, national awareness activities and events, technical assistance (TA) updates, and TA contacts. Click the link to view the newsletter for April 2014.

Support Group for Victims of Stalking

The Stalking Resource Center from the National Center for Victims of Crime released a resource in 2009 called How to Start and Facilitate a Support Group for Victims of StalkingThe guide describes its purpose as:

…to guide victim service providers, volunteers, and other concerned community members on how to initiate and implement a stalking support group. This handbook provides recommendations on how to locate partners and community support, identify resources, and engage victims who would like to participate in a stalking support group. It offers guidance on how to choose a leader or facilitator, how to prepare the leader, and how to run support group sessions that help members cope with the impact of stalking.

 

January 2014 issue of the Campus Technical Assistance and Resource Project Newsletter

newsletter

A newsletter created by the Campus Technical Assistance and Resource Project 

The new Campus Technical Assistance and Resource Project Newsletter is designed to keep you up-to- date on the latest and developments and opportunities for campuses in their efforts to address sexual assault, dating/domestic violence, and stalking. The newsletter will provide information on important events, successful programs and much more. Though some of the information will be most specifically applicable to campuses who have received grants under the Department of Justice, Office of Violence Against Women Campus Grants Program, this resource is intended for all colleges and universities.

Campus dating violence factsheet

ncvc logo

The Campus Dating Violence fact sheet is provided by the Office on Violence Against Women, the Dating Violence Resource Center, and the National Center for Victims of Crimes.   This factsheet provides statistics and resources related to dating violence on university and college campuses.

Setting the Stage and Planning the Route: Investigating Campus Sexual Misconduct Complaints

In this webinar hosted by Green Dot, Jeremy Inabinet talked about the foundational concepts for individuals conducting investigations for sexual misconduct complaints on college campuses. He gave recommendations on how to explore planning, partnerships, and information gathering, as it relates to an investigation. Some main areas that were focused on included the pre-investigation meeting for the victim and the respondent, how to design an investigation process to be as successful as possible, and the importance of maintaining an equitable and consistent practice.

Webinar slides      Recording

LGBTQ Relationship Violence & Sexual Assault

In this webinar hosted by Green Dot, Dr. Cruz talked about ways in which campuses can ensure they are being inclusive of and affirmative toward LGTBQ students. Dr. Cruz defined key terms and spoke about what to do and not do when engaging LGBTQ students. Dr. Cruz gave suggestions for ways campuses can improve their reach and meaningfully engage LGBTQ students on their campuses. She also answered questions about attitudes toward LGBTQ student groups, training judicial boards on hearing cases involving LGBTQ students, and where campuses can find resources to help them with their prevention efforts with regard to LGBTQ students.

To view the webinar slides click here

Forensic Experiential Trauma Interview (FETI): A Best Practice

This webinar presented by East Central Oklahoma University STAABLE Program, explains how to apply the science of memory and psychological trauma to enhance trauma interview approaches and techniques. Traditional training in this area focused on the explaining the impact of trauma on the “higher functioning” portions of the brain. However, research in the field demonstrates that these portions of the brain are not generally involved in experiencing and reacting to trauma. Adapting the principles used in critical incident stress debriefing and also the empathy-based techniques developed for forensic child interviews, the FETI process was developed to instead engage the ‘lower functioning’ portions of the brain. This technique reduces inaccuracy of the information provided and increases the likelihood of understanding the totality of the experience.

Click below to watch the webinar.

Survivor Disclosures in a Digital Era: Ethical & Legal Concerns 

This webinar presented by Alicia Aiken from NNEDV and Whitney Laas presented from the National Domestic Violence Hotline.  Colleges and universities are increasingly utilizing social media to interact and communicate with the campus community. Campus violence against women prevention and intervention programs have also started interacting in the online space. What happens when disclosures take place online or in social media? How can schools sensitively handle this type of disclosure and respond in a way that is survivor centered? What are the judicial and legal ramifications? Come learn how this is being addressed and what your university can do.

Click below to view the webinar.

Scoring a Hat Trick: Three Ways to Maximize your Partnership with Athletics

This webinar presented by Green Dot entitled, “In Scoring a Hat Trick: Three Ways to Maximize your Partnerships with Athletics,” presenters Darcie Folsom and CC Curtis of Connecticut College provided concrete suggestions for ways campus grantees can engage student athletes in their violence prevention efforts. Folsom and Curtis focused on three primary strategies: clearing the puck (investigating biases), planning for the power play (branding and relationship building), and the breakaway (making violence prevention the cool thing to do). Some of the concrete solutions offered during the webinar included attending athletic events, planning around athletes’ schedules, using a health promotion lens to engage athletes, identifying and building relationships with key athletic stakeholders, taking materials where athletes spend their time, giving recognition to athletes and coaches, highlighting your athletic partnerships when talking with prospective students, never mandating athletes to participate in prevention activities, and giving athletes tangible skills to keep their teammates from getting hurt or getting in trouble. Folsom and Curtis highlighted many of their successes at Connecticut College and answered questions about challenges, funding, and program assessment.

 

To view the webinar slides click here and to listen to the recording click here.